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Cinderella (1950) is the 94th episode of Screen Junkies comedy series Honest Trailers. It was written by Spencer Gilbert, Dan Murrell, Erica Russell and Andy Signore. It was narrated by Jon Bailey as Epic Voice Guy. It parodies the 1950 Disney animated film Cinderella in the format of a musical episode. It features song parodies with music and by AVbyte. It was published on March 10, 2015, to coincide with the theatrical release of Disney's live-action film Cinderella. It is 4 minutes 22 seconds long. It has been viewed over 8.4 million times.

Watch Honest Trailers - Cinderella (1950) on YouTube

"Get swept away by the tale of Cinderella, an orphan girl enslaved to her step-family, who's either a powerful druid that can talk to animals, or years of being locked away in the castle knitting sweaters for mice have slowly driven her mad." ~ Honest Trailers - Cinderella

ScriptEdit

From the studio that brought you Snow White, Fantasia, and The Story of Menstruation (Disney) comes the fairy tale that's been adapted for film again (Ever After) and again (The Glass Slipper) and again (Rodger and Hammerstein's Cinderella) and again (A Cinderella Story) and again (Another Cinderella Story) and again (Cinderfella) and again (Into the Woods) and again (Ella Enchanted) and, coming soon to a theater near you, again (Cinderella (2015)): Cinderella.

Revisit the animated classic that will cancel out all the empowering things your daughter learned from Frozen, where girls are taught to be pushovers, do all the housework, and that their problems will disappear if they're hot enough to land a rich husband. Get swept away by the tale of Cinderella, an orphan girl enslaved to her stepfamily, who's either a powerful druid that can talk to animals or years of being locked away in the castle, knitting sweaters for mice, have slowly driven her mad.

Cinderella (talking to two tweeting birds): Yes, I know it's a lovely morning, but...it was a lovely dream, too.

Yep, definitely crazy.

But everything will change when she meets her Fairy Godmother, a guardian angel who's waited years to improve Cinderella's life in any way, instead of helping her out when her parents died, or when her stepfamily forced her into slavery. (shows Cinderella's ripped dress being transformed into an elegant gown) Thanks for the dress, lady, but it woulda been more helpful if you'd bibbiti-bobbiti-called Child Protective Services, like, eight years ago.

Even though Cinderella's name is the title, spend more than half the movie watching a cat (Lucifer) try to contain the army of vermin who have infested every corner of the house and, for all his reasonable efforts to contain the rodent horde, gets Bran Stark'd out the window (shows Bran Stark from Game of Thrones being pushed out a tower window, followed by Lucifer falling from a tower window). Savor the age-old love story between a prince who couldn't be bothered to find his own wife and a king so desperate for heirs, he doesn't care whose uterus his son uses as a baby factory, whether it's a hermit maid who talks to mice or just someone with the same shoe size.

Grand Duke: This slipper may fit any number of girls!

King: That's his problem.

Whatever.

So travel back to a simpler time and sing along to the classic songs you've loved since childhood, like "The Song That Inspires False Hope"...

(sung to the tune of "A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes")

Cinderella: This song is about deception./Most dreams just don't come true,/But I am the rare exception;/I'm skinny and pretty and cute.

..."The Cute Little Mice Song"...

(sung to the tune of "The Work Song")

Mice: We are mice as smart as people;/We could kill you in your sleeple./Go ahead and tell somebody;/No one will believe you.

Gus: Watch us handle the scissors.

Jaq: We'll tear apart your innards.

Suzy: Stab your eyes out with a needle;/Watch us get medieval.

Mice: So don't mess with mice who are as smart as people.

...and "The Oscar-Nominated Gibberish Song".

(sung to the tune of "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo")

Fairy Godmother: Blurpity-blurp, a-derpity-derp,/A-blibbidi-blabbidi-blunk!/Anything rhymes if you make up the words./Zippity-zappity,/Flippity-flappity,/These writers clearly were drunk.

Starring I Ain't Saying She a Gold Digger (Ilene Woods as Cinderella), Bram Stoker's Dracula (Eleanor Audley as Lady Tremaine), The Kardashians (Lucille Bliss as Anastasia Tremaine and Rhoda Williams as Drizella Tremaine), Wilford Brimley (Luis van Rooten as the King), Prince Foot Fetish (William Phipps as Prince Charming), Rosie O'Donnell (June Foray as Lucifer), Modest Mouse (Jimmy MacDonald as Gus), and Unrealistic Expectations of Relationships That Girls Carry Into Adulthood.

Honest Trailers - Cinderella (1950)Open Invideo 3-36 screenshot

Honest title for Cinderella - Sweeping Beauty. Title design by Robert Holtby.

Sweeping Beauty

I know the stepmom was bad, but good luck with the father-in-law.

King: If anything goes wrong...(makes a beheading motion with his hand)

Trivia Edit

  • An Honest Trailer Commentary for this episode was recorded and was available on the Screen Junkies Plus until the website/app was discontinued. Screen Junkies don't currently have any way of releasing the video.

Reception Edit

Honest Trailers - Cinderella has a 97.8% approval rating from YouTube viewers. Elle declared the Honest Trailer was "genius" and that "this hilarious critique of the Disney classic may be better than the film itself." In the same article, Elle praised the parody songs and said the video was "scathing and hilarious." CinemaBlend said the Honest Trailer would shatter your nostalgia for the original. However, CinemaBlend also found some things wanting, writing "I definitely agree with a lot of the points that Honest Trailers is making, but I also think that they're not putting enough emphasis on one particular character... or rather, lack of character. I am, of course, talking about Prince Charming."

Many media sites praised the Honest Trailer for making some well-known points about how regressive the film's message is. Geeks of Doom discussed the video's commentary on feminism, writing that the Honest Trailer "takes pot shots at all the obvious old fashioned cliches, especially the obedient house-woman who uses her looks to snag a rich prince. It relishes in comparing the arcane views of the 1950s with the positive inspiring messages of today." Slash Film wrote "while we’ll forever treasure the old version as a childhood fave, this Honest Trailer does make some good points about how regressive, nonsensical, and downright bizarre it is." Slash Film also said the Honest Trailer "actually inadvertently makes a strong case for the new Cinderella, by pointing out how outdated the old one has become."

Bustle used their article on the Honest Trailer to discuss the anti-feminist message of Disney princesses more broadly, writing:

By now, we're all well-acquainted with the idea that Disney princesses of yore are poor examples of feminist role models, to say the least. There's literally no end to how much we can admonish these symbols of patriarchy, many of whom were first born into the world through fairy tales in times when "feminist" wasn't even a world, and unfortunately immortalized in Disney cartoons when it was. The hilarious Honest Trailers has taken on the original 1950 Disney animated Cinderella and its dangerously anti-feminist messages in their latest re-imagined truth bomb trailer....  Overall, the trailer serves to highlight the fact that Cinderella promotes the clearly problematic idea that in order to find a man (which is framed as a woman's primary goal in life), she must essentially change who she is (at least, if who she is is poor, ugly, or has mice-friends). Who she is on the inside doesn't matter, so long as she's pretty. (Kat George, March 7, 2015, Bustle)

Production credits Edit

Cinderella

Video thumbnail for Honest Trailers - Cinderella (1950)

Music by AVByte

Vocals by: Celeste Hudson, Antonius

Voiceover Narration by Jon Bailey

Title design by Robert Holtby

Series Created by Andy Signore & Brett Weiner

Written by Spencer Gilbert, Dan Murrell, Erica Russell & Andy Signore

Edited by Dan Murrell

External links Edit

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